Llano Art Project Set for Release

Special notice contributed by Larissa Nickel:

The rural Los Angeles County high desert region of Llano, California has historically been defined by innovative people willing to explore and define a new sense of place. “Yestermorrow Llano: An Artist’s Field Guide to Llano, California” introduces the past, present, and future narratives of Llano including its relationship to the local, regional, and global contexts of place—and their own yestermorrows.

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Yestermorrow Llano: An Artist’s Field Guide to Llano, CA

Date: Saturday, July 7, 2018

Time: 10 am-12 pm (noon)

Location: Blue Sky’s Bistro

12822 Pearblossom Hwy,

Pearblossom, CA 93553

Throughout the feminist geography field guide are cultural references, historical clippings, an artist’s archive, educational prompts, and collaborative activities to activate your sensory and artistic experiences of Llano. Create perfume, form a book club, make a recipe, or discover, map, architect, and construct your looking glass connection to the high desert by envisioning a geographic imagination and aesthetic experience of place through Llano’s cultural memory, collective present, and social futures.

Visitors at this release event can stop by the courtyard at Blue Sky’s Bistro to receive a free contemporary wallpaper design of Aldous Huxley’s “Crows of Pearblossom,” discover more about Llano, including its sights, sounds, tastes, and smells, and play a speculative design game of New Llano utopography to reveal the futures of your own experimental utopian communities.

“Yestermorrow Llano” is supported by the Los Angeles County Arts Commission and the Antelope Valley Arts Outpost creative placemaking initiative funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council with support from Metabolic Studio.

Outpost partners include: the Otis College of Art and Design MFA Public Practice program (Otis), the Lancaster Museum of Art and History (MOAH), the Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance (GAVEA), the Department of Regional Planning, and the Office of 5th District Supervisor Kathryn Barger.

Yestermorrow is a platform for cultural innovation and collective public engagement designed by Larissa Nickel to present new museological and archival perspectives to our past, present, heterotopian, and future experiences of place. Her work can be found at larissanickel.com


This article was contributed by the artist behind the project, who has been involved in a number of projects highlighting the art and ecology of our desert region: DEHSART & Hinterculture and others.  Take a look!

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Mari Hall – Electric Moon Baby

Antelope Valley painter and writer, Mari Hall, exclaims a “world view, personal, eclectic and electric, is an art lens uniquely shaped by growing through a spiritual,
cultural and technological revolution.”

Her paintings offer a perspective that seems to play on the tenets of both folk art/folk tales and science fiction, fusing a striking and particular modernism with a sense of the universal.

 

“Magnificat, Opus in Power”    
African American Folk Art
 “Foon”

 

 

 

 

 

And this makes sense when you find out that Mari Hall is also a science fiction writer. Her 2017 novel, The JuneNoon Effect, “is a thrilling ride through modern America. Set in the not-so-distant future it is a tale of modern life in an age of extravagance.”

 

The JuneNoon Effect cover imageReviewing the novel, Chazz Clarence Ross write that The JuneNoon Effect “espouses Mari’s intricate command of scientific unknowns in the sphere of political subversion and spiritual antagonism. Like a backwards, Halloween ride on Colossus, you will relish Mari’s sudden twists and turns in this potent, sultry journey that smirks the secrecy of Area 51, 911 and other supernatural enigmas.”

Find out more about Mari Hall at her aptly named website, electricmoonbaby.

 

Between You, Me, and the Joshua Tree

The idea behind this show is almost straight-forward, close to simple. The images selected for these collages are drawn from our local landscape here in the Mojave (and from ideas inspired by that landscape). So the art is a celebration of the natural world around us.

Between You, Me, and the Joshua Tree

Mojave Inspired Collages

by Eric Martin

Showing at Sagebrush Cafe in Quartz Hill starting February, 2017

But it’s also a recognition of the sublime that exists within that natural world, the silent substrata of the Numinous that infuses all things. It’s a way of taking a long pause to look again at the sights we learn to take for granted (and so stop seeing) and to find something sacred waiting there in the space of that intentional breath.

 

June Milham says that we may be losing sight of the sacred in today’s world. We may be too immersed in the details of our material lives, in our posts and tweets and updates, to take that necessary, intentional breath and let ourselves be surprised again at what silently waits for us in the desert, the ripeness of the natural world, each moment’s gravidity, pulsing with something that we recognize but cannot name.

And this is, technically, an image of the sublime – that which exists beyond the reach of our apprehension. It’s something built into our surroundings, just around the corner of what we can put into words.

These collages are little meditations on that idea, trying to be that breath, for a moment, where we see again the things that we have learned not to see. Making a brief celebration of our desert landscape.

Desert BeingnessThere are maps used here that sometimes play the part of the sky, a two-dimensional ground tilted up to imply something equally expansive but far more porous.

There is some idea here also that this palimpsest of texts – images, book pages, maps – might mimic the way we are forced to look at the world through all the words in our heads. There is something that comes between us and the Joshua tree we may happen to be staring at.

And we want to step past that mediating field of words and abstractions to approach the sublime, which is, in its way, both the ultimate abstraction and the ultimate reality. We want to take that Joshua tree and remove it from its background and see it for what it is.

Between You, Me, and the Joshua TreeBetween You, Me & the Joshua Tree

Mojave Inspired Collages

by Eric Martin

Showing at Sagebrush Cafe 

42014 50th Street West

Quartz Hill, Ca 93536

http://www.sagebrush-cafe.com

 

About the Artist: Eric Martin is one of the owners of Sagebrush Café. He started participating in gallery shows with his collage art in 2010. Martin is also a writer and English instructor and the editor of this site. You can see some of his essays at Pop Matters, the Write Launch and Steinbeck Now.

Celebrating the Desert – Edwin Vasquez

If the Mojave Desert is an oasis of natural and stubborn quietude set next to the traffic and the hubbub of Los Angeles, it is an oasis that also contains oases – a sort of Russian doll of harbors set within harbors.

Artist Edwin Vasquez sees this desert ethos and puts it into action too, as he is known to pick up hikers in Tehachapi and help them reach their next stop on the Pacific Crest Trail. Vasquez becomes, in a way, an oasis of humanity for the intrepid hiker who has been alone in the hills among the calls of ravens and the buzzing bees.

Stepping down into the desert, they might see some of what Vasquez sees and celebrates in the Antelope Valley environs.

Celebrating the Desert is a series of posts here at AV Arts dedicated to showcasing Mojave Desert-inspired work by local artists. Today’s post features the work of ever-active Antelope Valley artist Edwin Vasquez, who has been featured on the pages of AV Arts before.

 

From Edwin Vasquez:
The first photograph is from Apollo Park, near the General William J. Fox Airfield. It is an amazing community park. This is one of the three man-made lakes for fishing and boating. It is like an oasis in the middle of our desert.
Apollo Park
The second photograph is in the Piute Ponds, a group of ponds about 10 kilometers southeast of Rosamond. This large marsh is an important stop for migratory birds on the Pacific Flyway.
Piute Ponds
Thank you to the artists who to the artists who have participated in our humble initiative to celebrate our landscape with art.

The call for submissions in our Celebrating the Desert series will remain open until January 1, 2018.

Send in some of your desert-inspired art and a brief bio to AV Arts (poeticwax@rocketmail.com). Also include a link to your website if you have one.

Celebrating the Desert – Midge Haggard Burthe & Marcy Watton

Celebrating the Desert is a series of posts here at AV Arts dedicated to showcasing Mojave Desert-inspired work by local artists. Today’s post features the (amazing!) work of two Antelope Valley photographers – Midge Haggard-Burthe and Marcy Watton.

The photographs these two artists sent in demonstrate a simple and sometimes profound fact: Every landscape is a mirror. Like other mirrors, we almost always find what we expect to find in a landscape, we see the things we set out looking for.

These artists must have set out looking for beauty…

There is something important in this expectation. Because to go into the desert on the look-out for glory is to say something profound about where you live and who you are.

Seen in one way, these are expert photos of a photogenic landscape, one worth celebrating. Seen in another way, they are a testament to a remarkable and important underlying ethic, one that makes celebration possible in the first place.

From Midge Haggard-Burthe:

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This is near Devil’s Punchbowl in Juniper Hills.

My name is Midge Haggard-Burthe and I am a hypnotherapist, psychologist, and disabled Navy veteran who has lived in the Antelope Valley for most of the past 28 years.

From Marcy Watton:

Fairmont

Thank you for this opportunity for artists to share their work, and especially work that is inspired by our lovely desert.
These photos represent my favorite things to do: take photos of my explorations of the desert while riding my horse.
I graduated from UCLA with a degree in Fine Art.  I teach photography and art at a local high school. I’ve been creating art and riding horses my entire life, and feel so very lucky to be able to continue to do the things I enjoy the most and share what I have learned with the next generation of artists.
avsunset
A big thank you to the artists who have participated in our humble initiative to celebrate our landscape with art.

The call for submissions in our Celebrating the Desert series will remain open until January 1, 2018.

Send in some of your desert-inspired art and a brief bio to AV Arts (poeticwax@rocketmail.com). Also include a link to your website if you have one.

Celebrating the Desert – Lori Antoinette

For artists in the Antelope Valley, the Mojave Desert is more than just a background. It’s a source of inspiration, a place to let ideas wend and wander among the Juniper and the Creosote.

From California Poppies to Joshua Trees, artists of the Antelope Valley are gifted with enough iconic imagery in the desert landscape to rival almost any other part of the world.

Of course, natural beauty and interesting images can be found anywhere if you just look for it, but the sometimes drastic, often surprising, and usually wind-swept landscape of Antelope Valley just makes these things easy to find.

AV Arts recently put out a call to local artists who can attest to this.

One of those artists is Lori Antoinette, an artist working in multiple mediums and who seems to find different ways to “hear” the desert in her art. The work she sent in takes the form of an energetic response to some of the Mojave Desert’s most recognizable figures.

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Q: What is your artistic background?

My earliest memories are drawing with my Mom (who is a wonderful painter) at around  three years old. I had always taken some kind of art or craft classes growing up.

My degree is in Fine Art from Univ of MD and I also have a certification in textile design. I always loved painting people and architecture, but my degree is actually in abstract. After college I went back to figurative.

av nature

In the 90’s I belonged to an art collective called DAKO Vanguard. We shared a gallery space of the same name in the downtown LA Arts District for a time. I also had my own wearable art business selling at events and tv and movie sets.

I’ve been doing street art (chalk) for 25 years now, but since retiring from the airlines I have really been working hard to hone my skills. Life is always a work in progress…

Find out more about Lori Antoinette here:

Acton’s Harmonic Breeze and Palmdale High School Choral Union and Sunday Night Singers to Participate in PBS SoCal Holiday Celebration

This year’s L.A. County Holiday Celebration, put on by the Music Center and PBS Socal  will feature performances by the Harmonic Breeze, representing the Acton-Agua Dulce communities, and the Palmdale High School Choral Union and Sunday Night Singers.

The event is live, televised and streaming. Read on for details from the event announcement. Tickets are free, so if you are interested in attending just plan  your trip and go.

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The Emmy® Award-winning 58th Annual L.A. County Holiday Celebration — Music ensembles, choirs and dance companies from the many neighborhoods and cultures of the region celebrate the season during this free three-hour holiday show that is perfect for the whole family. PBS SoCal KOCE will broadcast this beloved program.

Highlights of the Holiday Celebration include theHarmonic Bronze Handbell Ensemble performing a classical handbell piece that celebrates Christmas and Hanukkah; holiday songs sung by the Palmdale High School Choral Union and Sunday Night Singers; the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department Band playing a medley of holiday favorites; MUSYCA Children’s Choir performing Christmas songs written by contemporary artists; Mostly Kosher playing upbeat Jewish folk and holiday songs; the Jung Im Lee Korean Dance Company on Korean drums; and Las Colibriperforming a collection of holiday songs. .

New groups to the show include City Ballet of Los Angeles, adding a new twist to The NutcrackerJC Culture Foundation performing both Chinese dragon and Chinese lion dances; West African drum and dance company Le Ballet Dembaya with a West-African mask dance; and the Los Angeles-based ensemble vocal group m-pact singing popular holiday songs.

For those who can’t make the free event at The Music Center on Dec. 24, the program will air live on PBS SoCal KOCE and stream live on pbssocal.org from 3 p.m. – 6 p.m. The program will be re-broadcast from 9 p.m. until midnight on Dec. 24. On Christmas Day, Dec. 25, the show will be available to stream beginning at noon.

WHEN:
Sunday, Dec. 24 from 3 p.m. – 6 p.m.
• Doors open at 2:30 p.m.
• Patrons may come and go throughout the three-hour performance
• A live broadcast of the show airs from 3 p.m. – 6 p.m. on PBS SoCal KOCE
• Live streaming at pbssocal.org
• The PBS SoCal KOCE broadcast repeats from 9 p.m. – midnight on Dec. 24, and again on Dec. 25 at noon with streaming also available; the program will air on PBS SoCal 2 on Dec. 25 at 3 a.m., 6 a.m. and 7 p.m., and on Dec. 26 at 11 a.m.

WHO:
• Performing artists from across Los Angeles County (see below for complete list)
• Sponsored by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors
• A presentation of The Music Center produced in association with CDK Productions 
• Live telecast on PBS SoCal KOCE is produced by CDK Productions

WHERE:

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The Music Center’s Dorothy Chandler Pavilion
135 N. Grand Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

HOW:
Information hotline: (213) 972-3099 or MusicCenter.org/holidaycelebra tion

ADMISSION:
FREE; no reservations or tickets to the show; first come, first seated

PARKING:
FREE in The Music Center parking garage

ARTISTS PERFORMING IN 58th ANNUAL L.A. COUNTY HOLIDAY CELEBRATION:

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• Citrus Singers is a 45 member voice and handbell ensemble from Citrus College.

• City Ballet of Los Angeles, blending classical and contemporary dance with music from around the world, will perform Nutcracker Swings to a mix of Tchaikovsky and Duke Ellington.

 Colburn Children’s Choir and Young Men’s Chorus, the advanced vocal ensembles of the Colburn School of Performing Arts, will perform festive songs for the holiday season.

• Daniel Ho & Halau Keali’i o Nalani will present Ho’s original songs in English and Hawaiian with captivating hula choreography.

• Gay Men’s Chorus of Los Angeles returns to the Holiday Celebration for the 23rd year in a row to perform traditional holiday songs.
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• Harmonic Bronze Handbell Ensemble, a music ensemble of 11 to 18-year olds representing the communities of Acton and Agua Dulce, will perform iconic holiday classics.

• Immaculate Heart of Mary and Precious Blood School Children’s Choir, a dynamic youth ensemble with an arsenal of multilingual and multi-genre repertoire, will perform songs that celebrate the Christmas holiday.

• JC Culture Foundation, a cultural and arts organization that provides programs for Chinese cultural activities, will perform both a Chinese lion and a Chinese dragon dance.

• Jung Im Lee Korean Dance Academy, the official Korean cultural ambassador to Southern California, will perform Korean drumming in traditional costume.

• Korean American Youth Performing Artists (KAYPA) will perform a traditional Korean fan dance.

• Las Colibrí, or “The Hummingbirds,” is an all-female mariachi ensemble that will perform holiday songs blending vocal harmonies with unique arrangements and interpretations of traditional sones, huapangos and rancheras.

• Le Ballet Dembaya, a professional West African drum and dance company based in Los Angeles, will perform a mask dance from the Mandenyi people of Guinea.

• The Los Angeles Children’s Orchestra, known for its members’ young ages and their advanced level of musicianship, will perform classical repertoire that celebrates the holidays.

• Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department Band, an all-volunteer group of musicians dedicated to giving their very best for the band, the Sheriff’s Department and the community, will play a traditional medley of Christmas and holiday carols.

• m-pact, an award-winning professional a cappella group, will perform unique renditions of popular holiday songs.

• Mostly Kosher, a Jewish cultural revival band, will play upbeat klezmer, plaintive Yiddish melodies and other Jewish heritage folk genres spun with a modern twist.

• Mt. San Antonio College Chamber Singers, an award-winning 38-member vocal ensemble, will perform a medley of traditional holiday songs.

• MUSYCA Children’s Choir, bringing together gifted young people ages four to 18 to create a community of singers built on respect, love for music and artistic excellence, will perform Christmas songs by contemporary artists.

• Pacifico Dance Company, a 32 member ensemble dedicated to the preservation and reconstruction of classical and contemporary Mexican dance forms, will perform an excerpt from Jaranas y Danzones de Yucatan — a glimpse into the Yucatan Peninsula.

• Palmdale High School Choral Union and Sunday Night Singers, a 45-member chorus made up of current high school singers and alumni singers from Palmdale High School, will perform traditional holiday repertoire.

• The Spirit Chorale of Los Angeles, a professional ensemble dedicated to keeping alive the Negro spiritual along with jazz, blues and original Gospel works, will perform inspirational songs of the season.

• VOX Femina Los Angeles, a choir of 34 women that gives women voice through the performance of quality choral literature, will perform songs celebrating Christmas and Hanukkah.
OTHER:
As Los Angeles’ largest multicultural holiday celebration, the annual L.A. County Holiday Celebration, presented by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, provides Angelenos of all ages an opportunity to come together on December 24 to experience and honor the dynamic, rich cultures of the County. During the event, many diverse L.A.-based artists and community groups showcase their talent, artistry and traditions on The Music Center’s iconic Dorothy Chandler Pavilion stage. The show is broadcast live in Southern California on PBS SoCal KOCE – home to PBS for Greater Los Angeles and Southern California – and on the Armed Forces Network. Viewers can also live stream it on pbssocal.org. While an estimated audience of more than 4,000 watch the show live at The Music Center, more than 18 million local viewers can enjoy the program on television and online.